Ingredient spotlight: Amino acids

Remember studying DNA and protein synthesis in biology? You might recall seeing a picture of a “chain” in your textbook, like beads on a necklace? Just to refresh, that “chain” was a sequence of amino acids that together forms a protein.

Many of our dietary supplements offer amino acids for good reason. Amino acids are the building blocks of life. They help build and repair organs, muscles, glands, ligaments, tendons, nails, skin, and hair. They also aid in the formation of antibodies, they carry oxygen through the body, and they play a role in muscle activity.

The body must have all the amino acids, essential and non-essential, in order to build the proteins it needs to repair, grow and maintain cells. Keep in mind that when you are under the weather or dealing with significant stress, your body may not be able to produce enough of these amino acids to meet your needs which makes supplementation very important.

When your body does not get the amino acids it needs, your muscles start to waste away, your immune response may decrease, fatigue sets in and you may notice changes to the texture to the skin and hair.1

Essential and non-essential amino acids

Essential amino acids are “essential” because you have to have them, and your body cannot make them on its own. The only way to get them is through food or supplementation. The following is a list of the nine essential amino acids; the first three are usually grouped together to make up branch chain amino acids (BCAAs).2

  • Isoleucine
  • Leucine
  • Valine
  • Lysine
  • Methionine
  • Histidine
  • Phenylalanine
  • Threonine
  • Tryptophan

Nonessential amino acids, on the other hand, can be produced by your body. Supplementation may still be necessary to maintain balance. The 11 nonessential amino acids.

What does the “L” in front of the name mean?

If you look on the ingredient label of your dietary supplement, you will likely see an “L” in front of the amino acid name. Example: L-arginine (a non-essential amino acid). This “L” means that the amino acid is in a form which your body can easily absorb. These amino acids are more similar to the ones in our bodies.

Supplement amino acids with PURE.

Foods plentiful in amino acids.

Since we’re talking about protein here, look at animal-based foods with the highest percentage of amino acids. Things like seafood, lean meat, eggs and dairy are all high in amino acids. Quinoa, beans, nuts, seeds and soy products are also high in amino acids.

Learn more about PURE and order today. Send an email to SalesSupport@livepure.com or contact us at 866-535-5888 for assistance.

 

1https://www.gbhealthwatch.com/Nutrient-Protein-Symptoms.php
2http://www.nutrientsreview.com/proteins/amino-acids

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